43.1701 Short title.

Cite as [A.S.C.A. § 43.1701]

This chapter may be cited as the “Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act”.

History: 1965, PL 9-1l.

Case Notes:

Court would accept foreign judgment for registration and enforcement in the name of the judgment creditor, but would not register and enforce an assignment to her attorney whose principal effect was to allow the attorney to avoid Court rule requiring admission to the Bar pro hac vice. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq.; H.C.R. 145. Parisi v. Parisi, 10 A.S.R.2d 106 (1989).

Petitions for registration of Western Samoan adoption decrees were denied where the petitions revealed nothing about the facts underlying the foreign judgments, sought a blanket declaration to the effect that Western Samoan adoption decrees were entitled to full faith and credit in American Samoa, and were conspicuously unrelated to any underlying rights at stake requiring "enforcement" in American Samoa. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq. In re Petition of Puailoa, 13 A.S.R.2d 22 (1989).

The Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act was designed to give a foreign judgment creditor the same right to enforce his judgment in American Samoa that he would have in the State or Territory in which he obtained the judgment. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq. Huff v. Huff, 15 A.S.R.2d 83 (1990).

Although the California family court which granted divorce judgment retained jurisdiction to enforce the judgment and the parties to that judgment could move to enforce it in that California court, High Court was not precluded from enforcing the judgment under the Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act where both parties currently resided in American Samoa. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq. Huff v. Huff, 15 A.S.R.2d 83 (1990).

Where enforcement of California judgment is sought in American Samoa, party against whom enforcement is sought is entitled to the same process here that he would receive in California. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq. Huff v. Huff, 15 A.S.R.2d 83 (1990).

Where court of foreign jurisdiction had issued new judgment substantially reducing the amount of its original judgment, the original judgment could no longer be registered in accordance with statute allowing for registration and enforcement of foreign judgments. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq. Parisi v. Parisi, 10 A.S.R.2d 106 (1989).

The Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act was designed to give a foreign judgment creditor the same right to enforce his judgment in American Samoa that he would have in the State or Territory in which he obtained the judgment. A.S.C.A. § 43.1701 et seq. Huff v. Huff, 15 A.S.R.2d 83 (1990).